Issues in Focus

The [itvt] editorial team develops the agenda for our TV of Tomorrow Show events through an extensive dialoguing process with the readership of the [itvt] newsletter (which includes many key industry players), in order to ensure that each show covers all the issues that are currently of most pressing importance to the industry. As a result, we typically announce the agenda just a few weeks before each show. However, some of the issues that we expect to explore at TVOT 2016 include:

  • Reports from the field: How recent deployments of "TV Everywhere," virtual MVPD/"skinny-bundle" services, unbundled, direct-to-consumer OTT programming offerings, interactive-TV/video programming and advertising, live social broadcasting, dynamic and addressable VOD advertising, tcommerce, programmatic TV advertising, social TV, smart-TV applications, TV time- and place-shifting, programming-discovery technology, viewing-data and analytics services, transmedia storytelling, virtual/augmented reality experiences, and other advanced-TV/video offerings are faring in the real world; and what the success or otherwise of these deployments tells us about the business models for the TV of tomorrow. Which advanced-TV platforms and services are attracting audiences and generating revenues today and how?
  • The emergence of "virtual MVPD's/MSO's" and unbundled programming services that are seeking to take advantage of TV delivery over-the-top (OTT); and the implications of this phenomenon for traditional TV content providers, operators, marketers and advertisers, as well as for Multi-Channel Networks (MCN's) and other emerging players.
  • The implications of the increasing importance of subscription as a monetization model for OTT TV.
  • The potential of tcommerce--whether on pay-TV systems, smart TV's, second-screen devices or social-media platforms--to revolutionize the economics of television and advertising.
  • The ongoing challenges involved in accurately measuring and understanding TV viewership on non-traditional platforms; and how audience measurement is being reinvented in order to take into account the growth of cross-platform viewing, time- and place-shifting, and other ongoing changes in viewer behavior.
  • The increasingly important role "Big Data" is playing in the television and advertising industries: the new forms of data that are being generated by interactive, connected and social TV, and how brands and agencies can take advantage of these data to make their campaigns more targeted, more accountable and thus more effective.
  • The impact of "TV Everywhere" on viewing habits, audience measurement, advertising strategies, network and pay-TV business models and more; and how best to improve content discoverability and personalization, subscriber-authentication, and other elements of the TVE user experience in order to foster the medium's continued growth.
  • The emergence of Periscope, Meerkat, YouNow, Blab, Twitch and other live social-broadcasting services as platforms for programming, marketing and advertising.
  • Understanding the respective roles now being played by Twitter, Facebook and Snapchat in the television and advertising spaces--what are those companies' TV goals, how likely are they to achieve them, and what do other social-TV players need to do in order to survive and thrive alongside such powerful companies?
  • Understanding the possible impact that other social media platforms, such as Tumblr, Pinterest, Reddit and LinkedIn, could have on the television space.
  • The implications for YouTube and other players of Facebook's increasing importance as a video platform.
  • Where is second-screen interactivity/social TV succeeding and where has it fallen short? What forms of programming and advertising are best complemented via interactivity on the second screen?
  • The implications of the incorporation of ACR and other "intelligent" technologies into smart TV's--and the increasing role of intelligence in the TV ecosystem in general: What kinds of opportunities does truly smart television make possible?
  • Best practices for developing, producing, distributing, promoting and monetizing interactive TV content.
  • The potential impact of Vine, Instagram Video and other "micro-video" platforms on programming and advertising.
  • Questions of intellectual property rights, including new issues raised by multiplatform TV distribution, by the revitalization of longtail programming content, and by the emergence of related content as part of the television experience.
  • Recent and pending developments in interactive and advanced TV standards, and how these standards need to evolve going forward.
  • US cable's Reference Design Kit (RDK) and its implications for the global pay-TV industry.
  • The significance of HTML5 and the Cloud for the television space.
  • How questions of content discovery, navigation and personalization have become central to television's future.
  • The growing importance of metadata and related content to the TV experience.
  • The emergence of smart-TV advertising and commerce.
  • The emergence of social-TV advertising and commerce.
  • The threat posed to video advertising by adblockers--and the new technologies and strategies that are emerging to counter that threat.
  • The evolving regulatory environment--including such issues as "AllVid" and Net Neutrality.
  • The emergence of personalized video experiences that draw on the viewer's social graph.
  • The emergence of the app--whether on connected-TV or second-screen platforms, or across both simultaneously--as the gateway to the television experience: is our conception of the app still beholden to the PC/desktop model, and, if so, what would be a truly television-centered conception of the app?
  • The emergence of virtual reality (VR) as a platform for storytelling and news reporting.
  • The extent to which the "cord-cutting" phenomenon presents an existential threat to the pay-TV industry; and the extent to which new developments in pay-TV, such as "TV Everywhere," virtual MVPD services, and dynamic ad insertion for VOD will help operators defend against the threats it poses.
  • The future of TV design: How to ensure that usability and high-quality design become a core element of the advanced-TV user experience, and not just an afterthought; strategies for designing consistent, cross-screen and cross-platform interactive video experiences; making the business case for good design; the complex and evolving relationship between design, data and content discovery/navigation; and the impact of new technologies such as 4K UHD on TV user interface design.
  • The emergence of natural user interfaces, including gesture- and voice-controlled interfaces, interfaces powered by facial recognition, and more.
  • Understanding international advanced-TV markets: opportunities and risks in Europe, Asia, Latin America and beyond.
  • The role of local broadcasters in television's rapidly changing ecosystem.
  • The emergence of brands as providers of advanced-TV experiences in their own right.
  • The on-air incorporation of social media into sportscasts, news shows and other forms of live programming, and the impact of this phenomenon on the content and monetization of television.
  • The emergence of new forms of cross-platform storytelling ("transmedia")--how will transmedia find a mass audience, and how will it be monetized?
  • The centrality of sports as a driver of television innovation--and as a firewall against cord-cutting.
  • Connected-TV app stores, over-the-top delivery of live and on-demand programming, hybrid pay-TV/OTT offerings, "cable-as-an-app," retransmission disputes, and more: The rapidly evolving inter-relationships between the pay-TV, consumer electronics and programming/content industries.
  • The current state of investment in the interactive/advanced TV space. How are new investment trends, such as crowdfunding and accelerators, impacting the industry?
  • The latest tools for creating, delivering and testing interactive and multiplatform television.
  • The real world as platform: The emergence of 360-degree immersive interactive TV experiences that subvert traditional notions of the screen.
  • The impact of video streaming on the Internet infrastructure; the significance of such issues as Net Neutrality, bandwidth caps and interconnection deals for the broadband video industry; and emerging standards and technologies for enabling high-quality streaming in low-bandwidth environments.
  • The emergence of sponsored data services and their significance for the OTT /mobile TV space.
  • The diversification of the cable business: How will the emergence of new cable offerings such as smart home services (e.g., broadband-based monitoring and security and automation) impact the cable industry going forward?
  • The increasingly importance of fan communities in the development, promotion and monetization of programming.
  • The evolving relationship between YouTube and its creators, the significance of the recent spate of acquisitions of YouTube MCN's by big media companies, and the prospects for the ongoing attempts of the MCN's to reduce their reliance on YouTube and embrace new platforms.
  • Wearable technology, virtual reality, augmented reality, near field communication, artificial intelligence, and more: Identifying the emerging technologies and media that could impact the television/video space going forward.
  • The relationship between smart TV and the second screen.
  • New technologies for collaborative editing of mobile video and their potential impact on the programming and advertising spaces.
  • The significance of the VOD "Binge-Viewing" phenomenon--its potential impact on advertising strategies, programming promotion and even programming formats themselves.
  • Mega-mergers, new automated/programmatic media-buying platforms and more: recent developments in the advertising industry and their impact on the television space.
  • Television's role in the "Internet of Things."
  • The significance of the 2016 election for the television and advertising industries.
  • How best to conceptualize the oft-promised "gamification" of TV.
  • The significance for television of the emergence of eSports.
  • How to reconceptualize advertising campaigns so that they reach viewers whose attention is dispersed across multiple screens.
  • Understanding the emerging viewing habits and evolving programming preferences of Millennials and Plurals ("Generations Y and Z").
  • How to ensure that programming, advertising and the institutions responsible for them reflect and are responsive to the increasing diversity of today's Millennial and Plural audiences and cultural influencers.
  • How to identify, manage and monetize the new social-video talent that appeals to Millennials and Plurals.
  • How to reinvent advertising, marketing and content-creation strategies in response to the new genres of programming and the new types of creators/influencers that are now engaging Millennials and Plurals on social-video platforms.

 

 

Experian